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Rogers: NSA 'is not listening' to Americans' phone calls

By By Ashley Killough
Published On: Jun 16 2013 12:39:36 PM CDT
Updated On: Jun 16 2013 09:15:55 PM CDT
Mike Rogers

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(CNN) -

The chairman of the House intelligence committee strongly asserted Sunday that the National Security Agency is not recording Americans' phone calls under U.S. surveillance programs, and any statements suggesting differently amount to "misinformation."

Lining up with Obama administration officials -- and the president himself -- Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Michigan, said the NSA "is not listening to Americans' phone calls" or monitoring their emails.

"If it did, it is illegal. It is breaking the law," Rogers said on CNN's "State of the Union." "I think (Americans) think there's this mass surveillance of what you're saying on your phone call and what you're typing in your emails. That is just not happening."

The NSA has repeatedly said that it collects only metadata -- phone numbers and duration -- of phone calls, but not the actual conversations taking place. If it needs to listen to a conversation, it must first obtain an order from the Federal Intelligence Surveillance Court.

But during a House judiciary committee hearing Thursday with FBI Director Robert Mueller, a Democratic congressman from New York said he was told in a classified discussion that NSA analysts were capable of obtaining specific information from phone calls without a warrant.

The congressman, Jerrold Nadler, issued a statement Sunday to CNN regarding his his exchange with Mueller at the hearing.

"I am pleased that the administration has reiterated that, as I have always believed, the NSA cannot listen to the content of Americans' phone calls without a specific warrant," Nadler said.

Rogers strongly pushed back at the question of whether anyone in the U.S. government was listening to the phone calls. He said "there is all this misinformation about what these programs are," and he hopes the public will soon come to better understand how the programs disrupted terrorist plots.

The intelligence community provided some of that counterterrorism justification, releasing a document Saturday to members of Congress and to CNN that says officials searched the database -- which holds billions of phone records - fewer than 300 times last year.

Along with the online surveillance program known as PRISM, the information-gathering has helped disrupt dozens of plots in the U.S and more than 20 countries, the document reported.

"They're doing this right, and it is protecting the United States from terrorist attacks being plotted overseas. This is an important program to continue," Rogers told CNN's chief political correspondent Candy Crowley.

"I think it's harder to catch (terrorists) if we don't have something like this," he said.

Asked about NSA leaker Edward Snowden, Rogers said the former contractor has "betrayed the country."

"It goes beyond the bounds of him trying to claim he's a whistle-blower - which he is not. A whistle-blower comes to the appropriate authorities with appropriate classifications, so we can investigate a possible claim," Rogers said. "He didn't do that. He grabbed up information, he made preparations to go to China and then ... bolted."

CNN's Gregory Wallace contributed to this report.